Meadow Monday: part three

Bee on Salvia

Happy Fall!  As of 10:49 AM on Saturday it is officially my favorite season of the year.  It seems as though Mother Nature flipped a switch this week, and all of a sudden we have much cooler days, the trees have started to turn, and the crops are starting to turn brown.  There’s a slight nip in the air at night, and the sky is a crisp blue.

This isn’t really a post about the meadow, but it is all about the outdoors around my house.

Pot Mums


Pot Mums

Mr. Lucky surprised me with some Pot Mums the other night.  We’re going to stretch it just a little bit and say that they were an anniversary present (since both of us sort of forgot).  They really do look just like they do in this picture- bright and colorful.  I plan on finding a spot for them in the meadow, towards the edge I think, and hope that they come back next year.

One thing I love about my lot of land, is that I can just walk around and see all sorts of things going on. The salvia in front is still a monster, and I love finding bees on it.

Bee on Salvia

Bee on Salvia

I chose this shot to share because you can really see the pollen sac on the leg of the bee.  I really want to propogate this particular plant, but I’m also really nervous because I don’t want to do anything that might kill it.  I’ve already lost two of them, and I would be heartbroken to lose this one.

I did successfully propogate another variety of salvia however, given to me by one of my friends.  Together we took a fair number of clippings, but only one survived out of the entire bunch.  It has grown quite nicely though, and took me by surprise.

New Salvia

New Salvia

The mums I planted two years ago are doing well again- they came back for the second year in a row!  I’m happily surprised that they keep coming back on their own with absolutely no help from me.  They too are becoming quite monstrous.  I wonder if there is anything I should be doing to make them look better though.  In particular, when should I remove the dead stems?  Should I deadhead the plant?

Monster Mum

Monster Mum

Walking around the back of the house, I noticed I was being watched.

Being Watched

Being Watched

There’s a pretty white cat with a raccoon colored tail who frequents our meadow.  If I move too fast or too closely to the meadow, it will take off.  It pleases me to know that this animal is taking some pleasure from our meadow.

Untouched Photo

Untouched Photo

And just because it was such a gorgeous day, I took this picture and didn’t do anything to it except add the watermark.  You can see where the scrub pines aren’t looking so good.  The one closest to the center lost it’s top in the bad storms we had a while back.

Here’s a peek at a project that I’ll be working on in the house for the next several months:

Project Door

Project Door

Yes I am painting all the doors in the house.  None of them were painted when we bought the house, and as I’ve been painting rooms, I try to paint the doors and trim in the room as well.  However, for most of the first floor, I had the house painted before we moved in, and I did not pay for the trim work sooooo…. I will slowly take one door off at a time, paint two light coats of bright white high gloss paint, and put them back.  My total tally of doors to paint:  22.  Actually painted to date: 6.  And 5 of those doors were painted ages ago, *Sigh.  This will take some time. But hey, at least it’s pretty easy to do and it will look great.

Meadow Monday: part two

View of Meadow from interior

It’s Monday again so here’s an update on the Meadow!

Today I am going to highlight another flowering weed, this one is called Horseweed or Marestail.  I am not 100% certain that it is the weed I’m picturing here, but that’s the closest thing I could find on the world wide web.

Horseweed

Horseweed

In it’s own way, it can be pretty.  The head hasn’t really started blooming yet, so I’m expecting to see this mass of white on top.  So far, all the natural “weeds” seem to be either white or yellow.  I’m hoping to plant some more purple bulbs this fall and hopefully some more perennials in the spring, which should bring a nice contrast.  Or maybe I should plan colors to change as the season changes… pinks early on fading to reds, and then to yellows and whites?  Hmm…I better come up with a plan and stick to it for this year though, otherwise I’ll never get it done!

Detail flowering head of Horseweed

Detail flowering head of Horseweed

So growing up this is not a particularly attractive plant, but hidden through my meadow I didn’t really notice it until it started to bloom.  According to the internet, it appears to be a scourge to farmers, taking over a lot of their crop, as it is also resistant to most of the herbicides used.  Ah well, it can have some space in my meadow, as long as it doesn’t take over everything…

View of Meadow from interior

View of Meadow from interior

From this shot, you can see a few scattered around, but it doesn’t stand out as much as the goldenrod does.  See those smaller pine trees?  They are coming out very soon.  If I have too many trees, it becomes woodland and not a meadow.  I actually prefer woodland, but not on my drain field.  I plan on selling this house one day, and I don’t think that a wrecked drain field would be a selling point.  Also, scrub pines (which most of those are) are not good trees for a forest.  Around here, they are spindly looking and frail.  They snap easily in the winds, and have a poor root system that comes up easily.  We’ve had five of them come down this year in storms.  Every year I think we’ve lost at least one or two.  The only thing they seem to be good for: woodpeckers love them.  Then again, I saw a woodpecker working on a utility pole here the other day.

This last friday my boss also surprised me with a new plant!  She bought this on clearance (and paid a mere fraction of the price tag):

New Daylily to plant

New Daylily to plant

The plant looks like it’s it in good condition, and now I just need to figure out where to put it!  I have a couple of spots I’m thinking about, but I’m going to wait until fall really starts to settle in.

In some non-meadow but still outdoor related news…the salvia out front is bigger than ever this year I think:

Salvia gone wild

Salvia gone wild

I really want to propogate it because I’d love to have many of these plants out back in the meadow.  I am worried about cutting too much however, and then nothing surviving.  I would be very sad to lose this plant, as it’s the last of three to survive that I planted the first year or two we were here.

Almost every window well to the basement has it’s own funnel spider chilling out.  Check this guy out:

Hello there Spider

Hello there Spider

They’re all pretty big spiders, but I’m happy to see them.  I like all my outdoor spiders because they catch and eat a lot of annoying bugs.  Also, I like my indoor spiders too for the same reason.

Happy Monday!

Making a Meadow

Widow Skimmer Dragonfly

We have been in our home for over four years now, and one area that has seriously been neglected is our yard.  I have planted the beds next to the house in the front and back, but have done little more than mow the rest.  We have an acre and a third, and so there is quite a bit of lawn to mow.  One of the first decisions we made was to not mow the entire yard.

Backyard view 2008

Backyard view 2008

This is what the backyard looked like when we first moved in.  We used the existing broom grass (I think?) as a guide to where we weren’t going to mow.  A large portion of the backyard is a drainfield, so we know that the best thing they say to do is to grow grass, and keep it short.  But frankly, I am not interested in a large mowed lawn.  I think they are akin to a desert.  I did not want to spend the time, the money, and the frustration on keeping a lawn.  I am way more interested in creating a diverse habitat for birds, small creatures, and bugs to find food and shelter.  Plus, I was hoping to have some color and texture out there to keep things interesting.

Start of a Meadow

Start of a Meadow

So four years later, and we do not have much to show for it.  This year, I decided I wanted to being adding plants and flowers.  Eventually, I hope it will all fill in with wildflowers, perennials, and grasses.

To start, I began taking out the trees that had started to grow.  There were some fairly large ones (scrub pines grow really fast).  But a few mornings out in long pants, my large brim hat, and a machete took care of most of the trees and wild blackberry bushes.  Although I do like blackberry bushes, around here they are considered a pest because they take over really quickly, are very prickly, and very difficult to get rid of.  I just chopped them down, but you need to dig up the root systems if you don’t want them to keep coming back.  I expect to go out there every once in a while and cut them back, and I don’t mind having some that bloom and produce berries (see food for the wildlife).

Meadows Edge

Meadows Edge

Some friends of ours were very generous and let me have some of their daylillies that were encroaching in their vegetable garden.  We dug up several clumps, and Mr. Lucky and I spaced them out along the edge of the meadow.

Blooming DayLily

Blooming DayLily

Many of them bloomed this year, although rarely at the same time.  I think they endured a bit of shock being transplanted from a slightly more shady, and more soil rich spot to my clay filled back yard.  I’m hoping that next year they will come back stronger.

My boss very generously gave me a bunch of very fancy daylillies from the Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden sale.  Even though they all seemed to survive, and some of them had buds, but I didn’t see any of them bloom.  (It is possible they bloomed while I was in CA, but no one saw it).

Mr. Lucky and I also bought a few plants to add to the mix, including a purple bee balm (I love our red version, Mondara), and some “Jethro Tull” Tickseed.

Jethro Tull Tickseed

Jethro Tull Tickseed

As soon as I planted the tickseed, a butterfly landed on it.  :)  Exactly what I wanted to see!  You can see in this shot it looks as though an animal has trodden on part of the plant.  The blooms lasted for about a week or two, and I deadheaded the plant quite a bit.  It continued to have a few blooms for several weeks, but nothing really showy.  I’m really hoping this will take off and spread out.

Purple Bee Balm

Purple Bee Balm

Something had either dug up or trampled on part of the bee balm too, but most of the plant survived.  It was more compact than I was expecting, and maybe eventually I’ll move it around.  I loved the color of the blooms though, and I really wish I just had massive mounds of this stuff.

Salvia

Salvia

We also bought a salvia plant.  There are so many varieties, and I love most of them.  They are supposed to be easy to propogate as well- which I will try next spring.  We have a very large salvia in the front, which I am also going to try to bring some of it to the back next year.  I love how tall this plant gets- and the bees love it.

Salvia in front

Salvia in front

Just this year I’ve also noticed a lot more of these dragonflies around- the Widow Skimmer.  I think they’re beautiful and they are natural bug control!

Widow Skimmer Dragonfly

Widow Skimmer Dragonfly

In this shot, you can see some of the daylillies blooming along the edge of the meadow.  You can also see a few trees I still need to take down.  I hate taking down trees because I love them, and the shade they produce.  I would be very happy to have a mostly wooded lot.  With these crazy storms we’ve been having however, we had a number of trees come down in the front yard.  They were mostly scrub pines that don’t really have root systems.  I don’t care for them as much, and would love to have a large variety.  Just this year I noticed we have several Willow Oak popping up in the front, and a Tree of Heaven.

Meadow in training

Meadow in training

There are also some weeds that I think are pretty growing in the meadow- these kinds of wildflowers I encourage.

Pretty Weed

Pretty Weed

As the summer gets hotter, I have a feeling that there won’t be much blooming.  I’ll feel lucky if things don’t die off completely.  I tried to plant some propogated roses and salvia- but I have a feeling it was way too late in the season and I didn’t water them enough.

For Christmas last year I did get some seed bombs, in the hopes that I would have some wildflowers pop up- but I don’t think I’ve seen anything from that either.  Every year I will just keep adding more and more until it becomes the riot of color I want.  :)

Another aspect to growing a meadow that really appeals to me, is that it is an ecosystem in flux.  Things will come and go, groups will spread, and some plants will naturally settle in.  Things are always evolving in a meadow, and I think that makes it interesting.  I love all sorts of gardens, from the most structured and formal to the completely wild.  I look forward to helping my meadow evolve.

To be continued…

Just cleaning up a little… (weekend part one)

Blooming Shamrocks

We did a LOT of yard work and garage cleaning here last weekend, and I just wanted to put some pictures up of how our front yard is supposed to look like when someone lives here (not completely overgrown).

Front View

Front View of House

It makes such a nice difference to mow the lawn and weedwhack.  We wonder why we don’t do it so often (I bet our neighbors are wondering this too).

Here you can see some lillies really getting big:

Growing Lillies

Growing Lillies

You can also see the snapdragons are still doing well.  It is harder to see, but there are light pink blooms on the bushes at the very ends– this is another plant that waited until the first round finished and then shot up and got some sun of its own.  The smaller pink and yellow flowers in the middle are new snapdragons I planted earlier this spring.  I hope they will end up being big and bushy like the others.

New Snapdragons

New Snapdragons

The flower bed in front of the porch still has lots of primrose blooms.

Front Flower Bed

Front Flower Bed

The larger green plant on the right is a salvia coming back for the fourth year in a row!  I love this plant, and wish that its siblings kept coming back, but it alone has lasted.  Some of the primrose has started trying to escape the bed.  If I let it, I’m sure it would take over the grass.  Eventually, I want to get rid of the stones, and make the entire section between the house and the sidewalk a planted garden.  Less to mow, and more for the birds and bees!

One last thing that surprised me–my Aunt gave me a Shamrock plant when I went out to visit her last.  I thought it wasn’t doing too well, but then bam!  Flowers!

Blooming Shamrocks

Blooming Shamrocks

I didn’t even know shamrocks bloomed like this.  It makes me so happy when I see it!